Archive for October, 2008

24
Oct
08

input sharpening in LightRoom 2

I was about to write a post on how I adjust the input sharpening in LightRoom2, but while I wrote, I started to rethink the method I was using. I need to experiment some more.

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18
Oct
08

local corrections, Lightroom or Photoshop

It’s been a while since LR 2 came about, and I’m increasingly fond of the new gradient and brush tool for local correction, but it’s definitely not for everything. Like with everything that is new, I have used this tool maybe a little too much lately, making it a bit difficult for myself. The thing is, even if it is local adjustments, they are not as precise as in Photoshop. First of all, unless you have one hell of a computer, the time you wait for the spinning beach ball (hour glass in Windows) will limit how much tweaking you do to a mask. My computer, an 8 core mac pro, really kick ass, so this isn’t that much of an issue for me, but I have tried to use it on a 2.16GHz iMac and it was not that fun. The second thing that limits the precision is that you have to paint the mask by hand. Ok, you can get some help, but the vast number of methods for creating masks in Photoshop is unbeatable. As a side note, the lack of precision when creating masks was my main issue against LightZone. This was even more annoying than LightRoom since the masks were made by creating vector drawings. Anyway, it seems like it is very important to not get stuck in LightRoom  when Photoshop can do a much better job, even now when LightRoom has become this versatile.

18
Oct
08

lots of subtle changes

This was so obvious when it suddenly dawned on me. The reason why I mostly end up with very few layers in my Photoshop editing is that I tend to try and make all the curve adjustment in one layer. One layer for dodging and burning, one layer for correcting colors and so on. So figuratively speaking, I wanted to paint the entire scene without lifting the brush from the canvas.

When I analyzed Diane Varners example a bit closer, I see her doing many small adjustments, and when I looked back at some of my more successful images, that is also what I have done. While doing this, you should pay attention to whether you start to create layers that reverse the effect of a previous layer instead of removing the previous. When I have done this, I have made my worst failures.

So, adding many small and subtle adjustments seems like an easier approach than doing it all in one stroke. And why not, this is what you do if you draw or paint.

17
Oct
08

inspired to process

As it happened, my little peek over at Diane Varners site inspired me to do some more Photoshop work. Just recently we set up the first print exchange at my new blog, Better In Print. I haven’t announced it too much here, but the three of us, Martin, robert, and I, selected one of our own prints and sent it to the other two. The purpose was to get some feedback, and to enjoy the prints of others. Oh, why don’t you just have a look and see what it is about.

Anyway, all this inspired me to reprocess the “Path to nowhere” again, which I have done for several days now, but tonight I made a leap forward. Now I really think I am approaching what I want to show with that picture.

 

And here is the old version.

17
Oct
08

post processing

I’ve visited Diane Varners picture blog, Daily Walks from time to time, and just now Paul Lester had a link to her in one of his posts. Since it was a couple of months since I dropped by last, I clicked on the link, and I was rewarded by one of her beautiful images. 

She definitely has a distinct look to her photographs that is created through post processing, and she has made a couple of short tutorials that describes what she does. You’ll find them here. Well worth reading even if you don’t like the result all that much. I like much of what she does, but not all. When I look at her example, and compare it with my own effort, I rarely use that many layers. Usually it is only my failed attempts that has that many layers. I seldom see the use of that many correction. 

That might be because I don’t have the need for it in my photos, or it may be that I don’t have the ability to see what I should do. Probably a combination, but I wonder what the mix is.

15
Oct
08

some moss

Not much to say, just this photograph.

 

14
Oct
08

baking bread

I was just trying to get through the back log of old Lenswork podcasts when I ran accross one where Brooks Jensen told about his passion for baking bread. That is at least one thing I share with him. My photographs may have a way to go before their up to his standard, but I’m pretty confident that my breads are pretty good.

It’s a pretty relaxing activity, and enjoyable both in the doing and in the consuming. It can be turned into an obsession as well. A friend of mine is cultivating his own yeast and sour dough, and has avery broad range of techniques for mixing, kneading and raising the dough. Well, I’m not going to turn this into a bread baking blog, but it is always fun when you find someone with common interests, so I thought I’d just mention it.




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